Kleines Problem während Installation

  • Kleines Problem während Installation

    Ich versuche gerade das Projekt laut der Anleitung für meinen Raspberry Pi2 zu installieren. Jetzt hänge ich aber leider bei Punkt 5 dem vorletzten Befehl fest.

    Source Code

    1. php install.php


    Ich bekomme dann immer ein Fehler:

    Verbindung zur Datenbank fehlgeschlagen.


    Kennt jemand das Problem?
  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    # 1gb => 1024*1024*1024 bytes
    #
    # units are case insensitive so 1GB 1Gb 1gB are all the same.

    # By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
    # Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
    daemonize yes

    # When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
    # Redis configuration file example

    # Note on units: when memory size is needed, it is possible to specifiy
    # it in the usual form of 1k 5GB 4M and so forth:
    #
    # 1k => 1000 bytes
    # 1kb => 1024 bytes
    # 1m => 1000000 bytes
    # 1mb => 1024*1024 bytes
    # 1g => 1000000000 bytes


    Das steht da drinnen.
  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    Hmmm....
    Meine sieht so aus:

    Source Code

    1. # Redis configuration file example
    2. # Note on units: when memory size is needed, it is possible to specify
    3. # it in the usual form of 1k 5GB 4M and so forth:
    4. #
    5. # 1k => 1000 bytes
    6. # 1kb => 1024 bytes
    7. # 1m => 1000000 bytes
    8. # 1mb => 1024*1024 bytes
    9. # 1g => 1000000000 bytes
    10. # 1gb => 1024*1024*1024 bytes
    11. #
    12. # units are case insensitive so 1GB 1Gb 1gB are all the same.
    13. ################################## INCLUDES ###################################
    14. # Include one or more other config files here.  This is useful if you
    15. # have a standard template that goes to all Redis server but also need
    16. # to customize a few per-server settings.  Include files can include
    17. # other files, so use this wisely.
    18. #
    19. # Notice option "include" won't be rewritten by command "CONFIG REWRITE"
    20. # from admin or Redis Sentinel. Since Redis always uses the last processed
    21. # line as value of a configuration directive, you'd better put includes
    22. # at the beginning of this file to avoid overwriting config change at runtime.
    23. #
    24. # If instead you are interested in using includes to override configuration
    25. # options, it is better to use include as the last line.
    26. #
    27. # include /path/to/local.conf
    28. # include /path/to/other.conf
    29. ################################ GENERAL  #####################################
    30. # By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
    31. # Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
    32. daemonize yes
    33. # When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by
    34. # default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
    35. pidfile /var/run/redis/redis-server.pid
    36. # Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379.
    37. # If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
    38. port 6379
    39. # TCP listen() backlog.
    40. #
    41. # In high requests-per-second environments you need an high backlog in order
    42. # to avoid slow clients connections issues. Note that the Linux kernel
    43. # will silently truncate it to the value of /proc/sys/net/core/somaxconn so
    44. # make sure to raise both the value of somaxconn and tcp_max_syn_backlog
    45. # in order to get the desired effect.
    46. tcp-backlog 511
    47. # By default Redis listens for connections from all the network interfaces
    48. # available on the server. It is possible to listen to just one or multiple
    49. # interfaces using the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or
    50. # more IP addresses.
    51. #
    52. # Examples:
    53. #
    54. # bind 192.168.1.100 10.0.0.1
    55. bind 127.0.0.1 192.168.2.81
    56. # Specify the path for the Unix socket that will be used to listen for
    57. # incoming connections. There is no default, so Redis will not listen
    58. # on a unix socket when not specified.
    59. #
    60. # unixsocket /tmp/redis.sock
    61. # unixsocketperm 700
    62. # Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
    63. timeout 0
    64. # TCP keepalive.
    65. #
    66. # If non-zero, use SO_KEEPALIVE to send TCP ACKs to clients in absence
    67. # of communication. This is useful for two reasons:
    68. #
    69. # 1) Detect dead peers.
    70. # 2) Take the connection alive from the point of view of network
    71. #    equipment in the middle.
    72. #
    73. # On Linux, the specified value (in seconds) is the period used to send ACKs.
    74. # Note that to close the connection the double of the time is needed.
    75. # On other kernels the period depends on the kernel configuration.
    76. #
    77. # A reasonable value for this option is 60 seconds.
    78. tcp-keepalive 0
    79. # Specify the server verbosity level.
    80. # This can be one of:
    81. # debug (a lot of information, useful for development/testing)
    82. # verbose (many rarely useful info, but not a mess like the debug level)
    83. # notice (moderately verbose, what you want in production probably)
    84. # warning (only very important / critical messages are logged)
    85. loglevel notice
    86. # Specify the log file name. Also the empty string can be used to force
    87. # Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
    88. # output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
    89. logfile /var/log/redis/redis-server.log
    90. # To enable logging to the system logger, just set 'syslog-enabled' to yes,
    91. # and optionally update the other syslog parameters to suit your needs.
    92. # syslog-enabled no
    93. # Specify the syslog identity.
    94. # syslog-ident redis
    95. # Specify the syslog facility. Must be USER or between LOCAL0-LOCAL7.
    96. # syslog-facility local0
    97. # Set the number of databases. The default database is DB 0, you can select
    98. # a different one on a per-connection basis using SELECT <dbid> where
    99. # dbid is a number between 0 and 'databases'-1
    100. databases 16
    101. ################################ SNAPSHOTTING  ################################
    102. #
    103. # Save the DB on disk:
    104. #
    105. #   save <seconds> <changes>
    106. #
    107. #   Will save the DB if both the given number of seconds and the given
    108. #   number of write operations against the DB occurred.
    109. #
    110. #   In the example below the behaviour will be to save:
    111. #   after 900 sec (15 min) if at least 1 key changed
    112. #   after 300 sec (5 min) if at least 10 keys changed
    113. #   after 60 sec if at least 10000 keys changed
    114. #
    115. #   Note: you can disable saving at all commenting all the "save" lines.
    116. #
    117. #   It is also possible to remove all the previously configured save
    118. #   points by adding a save directive with a single empty string argument
    119. #   like in the following example:
    120. #
    121. #   save ""
    122. save 900 1
    123. save 300 10
    124. save 60 10000
    125. # By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
    126. # (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
    127. # This will make the user aware (in a hard way) that data is not persisting
    128. # on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
    129. # disaster will happen.
    130. #
    131. # If the background saving process will start working again Redis will
    132. # automatically allow writes again.
    133. #
    134. # However if you have setup your proper monitoring of the Redis server
    135. # and persistence, you may want to disable this feature so that Redis will
    136. # continue to work as usual even if there are problems with disk,
    137. # permissions, and so forth.
    138. stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
    139. # Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
    140. # For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
    141. # If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
    142. # the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
    143. rdbcompression yes
    144. # Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
    145. # This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
    146. # hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
    147. # for maximum performances.
    148. #
    149. # RDB files created with checksum disabled have a checksum of zero that will
    150. # tell the loading code to skip the check.
    151. rdbchecksum yes
    152. # The filename where to dump the DB
    153. dbfilename dump.rdb
    154. # The working directory.
    155. #
    156. # The DB will be written inside this directory, with the filename specified
    157. # above using the 'dbfilename' configuration directive.
    158. #
    159. # The Append Only File will also be created inside this directory.
    160. #
    161. # Note that you must specify a directory here, not a file name.
    162. dir /var/lib/redis
    163. ################################# REPLICATION #################################
    164. # Master-Slave replication. Use slaveof to make a Redis instance a copy of
    165. # another Redis server. A few things to understand ASAP about Redis replication.
    166. #
    167. # 1) Redis replication is asynchronous, but you can configure a master to
    168. #    stop accepting writes if it appears to be not connected with at least
    169. #    a given number of slaves.
    170. # 2) Redis slaves are able to perform a partial resynchronization with the
    171. #    master if the replication link is lost for a relatively small amount of
    172. #    time. You may want to configure the replication backlog size (see the next
    173. #    sections of this file) with a sensible value depending on your needs.
    174. # 3) Replication is automatic and does not need user intervention. After a
    175. #    network partition slaves automatically try to reconnect to masters
    176. #    and resynchronize with them.
    177. #
    178. # slaveof <masterip> <masterport>
    179. # If the master is password protected (using the "requirepass" configuration
    180. # directive below) it is possible to tell the slave to authenticate before
    181. # starting the replication synchronization process, otherwise the master will
    182. # refuse the slave request.
    183. #
    184. # masterauth <master-password>
    185. # When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
    186. # is still in progress, the slave can act in two different ways:
    187. #
    188. # 1) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default) the slave will
    189. #    still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data, or the
    190. #    data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
    191. #
    192. # 2) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'no' the slave will reply with
    193. #    an error "SYNC with master in progress" to all the kind of commands
    194. #    but to INFO and SLAVEOF.
    195. #
    196. slave-serve-stale-data yes
    197. # You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
    198. # a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
    199. # written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
    200. # may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
    201. # misconfiguration.
    202. #
    203. # Since Redis 2.6 by default slaves are read-only.
    204. #
    205. # Note: read only slaves are not designed to be exposed to untrusted clients
    206. # on the internet. It's just a protection layer against misuse of the instance.
    207. # Still a read only slave exports by default all the administrative commands
    208. # such as CONFIG, DEBUG, and so forth. To a limited extent you can improve
    209. # security of read only slaves using 'rename-command' to shadow all the
    210. # administrative / dangerous commands.
    211. slave-read-only yes
    212. # Slaves send PINGs to server in a predefined interval. It's possible to change
    213. # this interval with the repl_ping_slave_period option. The default value is 10
    214. # seconds.
    215. #
    216. # repl-ping-slave-period 10
    217. # The following option sets the replication timeout for:
    218. #
    219. # 1) Bulk transfer I/O during SYNC, from the point of view of slave.
    220. # 2) Master timeout from the point of view of slaves (data, pings).
    221. # 3) Slave timeout from the point of view of masters (REPLCONF ACK pings).
    222. #
    223. # It is important to make sure that this value is greater than the value
    224. # specified for repl-ping-slave-period otherwise a timeout will be detected
    225. # every time there is low traffic between the master and the slave.
    226. #
    227. # repl-timeout 60
    228. # Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
    229. #
    230. # If you select "yes" Redis will use a smaller number of TCP packets and
    231. # less bandwidth to send data to slaves. But this can add a delay for
    232. # the data to appear on the slave side, up to 40 milliseconds with
    233. # Linux kernels using a default configuration.
    234. #
    235. # If you select "no" the delay for data to appear on the slave side will
    236. # be reduced but more bandwidth will be used for replication.
    237. #
    238. # By default we optimize for low latency, but in very high traffic conditions
    239. # or when the master and slaves are many hops away, turning this to "yes" may
    240. # be a good idea.
    241. repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
    242. # Set the replication backlog size. The backlog is a buffer that accumulates
    243. # slave data when slaves are disconnected for some time, so that when a slave
    244. # wants to reconnect again, often a full resync is not needed, but a partial
    245. # resync is enough, just passing the portion of data the slave missed while
    246. # disconnected.
    247. #
    248. # The biggest the replication backlog, the longer the time the slave can be
    249. # disconnected and later be able to perform a partial resynchronization.
    250. #
    251. # The backlog is only allocated once there is at least a slave connected.
    252. #
    253. # repl-backlog-size 1mb
    254. # After a master has no longer connected slaves for some time, the backlog
    255. # will be freed. The following option configures the amount of seconds that
    256. # need to elapse, starting from the time the last slave disconnected, for
    257. # the backlog buffer to be freed.
    258. #
    259. # A value of 0 means to never release the backlog.
    260. #
    261. # repl-backlog-ttl 3600
    262. # The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
    263. # It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
    264. # master if the master is no longer working correctly.
    265. #
    266. # A slave with a low priority number is considered better for promotion, so
    267. # for instance if there are three slaves with priority 10, 100, 25 Sentinel will
    268. # pick the one with priority 10, that is the lowest.
    269. #
    270. # However a special priority of 0 marks the slave as not able to perform the
    271. # role of master, so a slave with priority of 0 will never be selected by
    272. # Redis Sentinel for promotion.
    273. #
    274. # By default the priority is 100.
    275. slave-priority 100
    276. # It is possible for a master to stop accepting writes if there are less than
    277. # N slaves connected, having a lag less or equal than M seconds.
    278. #
    279. # The N slaves need to be in "online" state.
    280. #
    281. # The lag in seconds, that must be <= the specified value, is calculated from
    282. # the last ping received from the slave, that is usually sent every second.
    283. #
    284. # This option does not GUARANTEES that N replicas will accept the write, but
    285. # will limit the window of exposure for lost writes in case not enough slaves
    286. # are available, to the specified number of seconds.
    287. #
    288. # For example to require at least 3 slaves with a lag <= 10 seconds use:
    289. #
    290. # min-slaves-to-write 3
    291. # min-slaves-max-lag 10
    292. #
    293. # Setting one or the other to 0 disables the feature.
    294. #
    295. # By default min-slaves-to-write is set to 0 (feature disabled) and
    296. # min-slaves-max-lag is set to 10.
    297. ################################## SECURITY ###################################
    298. # Require clients to issue AUTH <PASSWORD> before processing any other
    299. # commands.  This might be useful in environments in which you do not trust
    300. # others with access to the host running redis-server.
    301. #
    302. # This should stay commented out for backward compatibility and because most
    303. # people do not need auth (e.g. they run their own servers).
    304. #
    305. # Warning: since Redis is pretty fast an outside user can try up to
    306. # 150k passwords per second against a good box. This means that you should
    307. # use a very strong password otherwise it will be very easy to break.
    308. #
    309. # requirepass foobared
    310. # Command renaming.
    311. #
    312. # It is possible to change the name of dangerous commands in a shared
    313. # environment. For instance the CONFIG command may be renamed into something
    314. # hard to guess so that it will still be available for internal-use tools
    315. # but not available for general clients.
    316. #
    317. # Example:
    318. #
    319. # rename-command CONFIG b840fc02d524045429941cc15f59e41cb7be6c52
    320. #
    321. # It is also possible to completely kill a command by renaming it into
    322. # an empty string:
    323. #
    324. # rename-command CONFIG ""
    325. #
    326. # Please note that changing the name of commands that are logged into the
    327. # AOF file or transmitted to slaves may cause problems.
    328. ################################### LIMITS ####################################
    329. # Set the max number of connected clients at the same time. By default
    330. # this limit is set to 10000 clients, however if the Redis server is not
    331. # able to configure the process file limit to allow for the specified limit
    332. # the max number of allowed clients is set to the current file limit
    333. # minus 32 (as Redis reserves a few file descriptors for internal uses).
    334. #
    335. # Once the limit is reached Redis will close all the new connections sending
    336. # an error 'max number of clients reached'.
    337. #
    338. # maxclients 10000
    339. # Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
    340. # When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
    341. # according to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemory-policy).
    342. #
    343. # If Redis can't remove keys according to the policy, or if the policy is
    344. # set to 'noeviction', Redis will start to reply with errors to commands
    345. # that would use more memory, like SET, LPUSH, and so on, and will continue
    346. # to reply to read-only commands like GET.
    347. #
    348. # This option is usually useful when using Redis as an LRU cache, or to set
    349. # a hard memory limit for an instance (using the 'noeviction' policy).
    350. #
    351. # WARNING: If you have slaves attached to an instance with maxmemory on,
    352. # the size of the output buffers needed to feed the slaves are subtracted
    353. # from the used memory count, so that network problems / resyncs will
    354. # not trigger a loop where keys are evicted, and in turn the output
    355. # buffer of slaves is full with DELs of keys evicted triggering the deletion
    356. # of more keys, and so forth until the database is completely emptied.
    357. #
    358. # In short... if you have slaves attached it is suggested that you set a lower
    359. # limit for maxmemory so that there is some free RAM on the system for slave
    360. # output buffers (but this is not needed if the policy is 'noeviction').
    361. #
    362. # maxmemory <bytes>
    363. # MAXMEMORY POLICY: how Redis will select what to remove when maxmemory
    364. # is reached. You can select among five behaviors:
    365. #
    366. # volatile-lru -> remove the key with an expire set using an LRU algorithm
    367. # allkeys-lru -> remove any key accordingly to the LRU algorithm
    368. # volatile-random -> remove a random key with an expire set
    369. # allkeys-random -> remove a random key, any key
    370. # volatile-ttl -> remove the key with the nearest expire time (minor TTL)
    371. # noeviction -> don't expire at all, just return an error on write operations
    372. #
    373. # Note: with any of the above policies, Redis will return an error on write
    374. #       operations, when there are not suitable keys for eviction.
    375. #
    376. #       At the date of writing this commands are: set setnx setex append
    377. #       incr decr rpush lpush rpushx lpushx linsert lset rpoplpush sadd
    378. #       sinter sinterstore sunion sunionstore sdiff sdiffstore zadd zincrby
    379. #       zunionstore zinterstore hset hsetnx hmset hincrby incrby decrby
    380. #       getset mset msetnx exec sort
    381. #
    382. # The default is:
    383. #
    384. # maxmemory-policy volatile-lru
    385. # LRU and minimal TTL algorithms are not precise algorithms but approximated
    386. # algorithms (in order to save memory), so you can select as well the sample
    387. # size to check. For instance for default Redis will check three keys and
    388. # pick the one that was used less recently, you can change the sample size
    389. # using the following configuration directive.
    390. #
    391. # maxmemory-samples 3
    392. ############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
    393. # By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
    394. # good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
    395. # a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
    396. # the configured save points).
    397. #
    398. # The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
    399. # much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
    400. # (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
    401. # dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
    402. # wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
    403. # still running correctly.
    404. #
    405. # AOF and RDB persistence can be enabled at the same time without problems.
    406. # If the AOF is enabled on startup Redis will load the AOF, that is the file
    407. # with the better durability guarantees.
    408. #
    409. # Please check http://redis.io/topics/persistence for more information.
    410. appendonly no
    411. # The name of the append only file (default: "appendonly.aof")
    412. appendfilename "appendonly.aof"
    413. # The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
    414. # instead to wait for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
    415. # data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
    416. #
    417. # Redis supports three different modes:
    418. #
    419. # no: don't fsync, just let the OS flush the data when it wants. Faster.
    420. # always: fsync after every write to the append only log . Slow, Safest.
    421. # everysec: fsync only one time every second. Compromise.
    422. #
    423. # The default is "everysec", as that's usually the right compromise between
    424. # speed and data safety. It's up to you to understand if you can relax this to
    425. # "no" that will let the operating system flush the output buffer when
    426. # it wants, for better performances (but if you can live with the idea of
    427. # some data loss consider the default persistence mode that's snapshotting),
    428. # or on the contrary, use "always" that's very slow but a bit safer than
    429. # everysec.
    430. #
    431. # More details please check the following article:
    432. # http://antirez.com/post/redis-persistence-demystified.html
    433. #
    434. # If unsure, use "everysec".
    435. # appendfsync always
    436. appendfsync everysec
    437. # appendfsync no
    438. # When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
    439. # saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
    440. # performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
    441. # Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
    442. # this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
    443. # our synchronous write(2) call.
    444. #
    445. # In order to mitigate this problem it's possible to use the following option
    446. # that will prevent fsync() from being called in the main process while a
    447. # BGSAVE or BGREWRITEAOF is in progress.
    448. #
    449. # This means that while another child is saving, the durability of Redis is
    450. # the same as "appendfsync none". In practical terms, this means that it is
    451. # possible to lose up to 30 seconds of log in the worst scenario (with the
    452. # default Linux settings).
    453. #
    454. # If you have latency problems turn this to "yes". Otherwise leave it as
    455. # "no" that is the safest pick from the point of view of durability.
    456. no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
    457. # Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
    458. # Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
    459. # BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
    460. #
    461. # This is how it works: Redis remembers the size of the AOF file after the
    462. # latest rewrite (if no rewrite has happened since the restart, the size of
    463. # the AOF at startup is used).
    464. #
    465. # This base size is compared to the current size. If the current size is
    466. # bigger than the specified percentage, the rewrite is triggered. Also
    467. # you need to specify a minimal size for the AOF file to be rewritten, this
    468. # is useful to avoid rewriting the AOF file even if the percentage increase
    469. # is reached but it is still pretty small.
    470. #
    471. # Specify a percentage of zero in order to disable the automatic AOF
    472. # rewrite feature.
    473. auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
    474. auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
    475. ################################ LUA SCRIPTING  ###############################
    476. # Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
    477. #
    478. # If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
    479. # still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
    480. # reply to queries with an error.
    481. #
    482. # When a long running script exceed the maximum execution time only the
    483. # SCRIPT KILL and SHUTDOWN NOSAVE commands are available. The first can be
    484. # used to stop a script that did not yet called write commands. The second
    485. # is the only way to shut down the server in the case a write commands was
    486. # already issue by the script but the user don't want to wait for the natural
    487. # termination of the script.
    488. #
    489. # Set it to 0 or a negative value for unlimited execution without warnings.
    490. lua-time-limit 5000
    491. ################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
    492. # The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
    493. # execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
    494. # like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
    495. # but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
    496. # stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
    497. # other requests in the meantime).
    498. #
    499. # You can configure the slow log with two parameters: one tells Redis
    500. # what is the execution time, in microseconds, to exceed in order for the
    501. # command to get logged, and the other parameter is the length of the
    502. # slow log. When a new command is logged the oldest one is removed from the
    503. # queue of logged commands.
    504. # The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
    505. # to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
    506. # a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
    507. slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
    508. # There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
    509. # You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
    510. slowlog-max-len 128
    511. ################################ LATENCY MONITOR ##############################
    512. # The Redis latency monitoring subsystem samples different operations
    513. # at runtime in order to collect data related to possible sources of
    514. # latency of a Redis instance.
    515. #
    516. # Via the LATENCY command this information is available to the user that can
    517. # print graphs and obtain reports.
    518. #
    519. # The system only logs operations that were performed in a time equal or
    520. # greater than the amount of milliseconds specified via the
    521. # latency-monitor-threshold configuration directive. When its value is set
    522. # to zero, the latency monitor is turned off.
    523. #
    524. # By default latency monitoring is disabled since it is mostly not needed
    525. # if you don't have latency issues, and collecting data has a performance
    526. # impact, that while very small, can be measured under big load. Latency
    527. # monitoring can easily be enalbed at runtime using the command
    528. # "CONFIG SET latency-monitor-threshold <milliseconds>" if needed.
    529. latency-monitor-threshold 0
    530. ############################# Event notification ##############################
    531. # Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space.
    532. # This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications
    533. #
    534. # For instance if keyspace events notification is enabled, and a client
    535. # performs a DEL operation on key "foo" stored in the Database 0, two
    536. # messages will be published via Pub/Sub:
    537. #
    538. # PUBLISH __keyspace@0__:foo del
    539. # PUBLISH __keyevent@0__:del foo
    540. #
    541. # It is possible to select the events that Redis will notify among a set
    542. # of classes. Every class is identified by a single character:
    543. #
    544. #  K     Keyspace events, published with __keyspace@<db>__ prefix.
    545. #  E     Keyevent events, published with __keyevent@<db>__ prefix.
    546. #  g     Generic commands (non-type specific) like DEL, EXPIRE, RENAME, ...
    547. #  $     String commands
    548. #  l     List commands
    549. #  s     Set commands
    550. #  h     Hash commands
    551. #  z     Sorted set commands
    552. #  x     Expired events (events generated every time a key expires)
    553. #  e     Evicted events (events generated when a key is evicted for maxmemory)
    554. #  A     Alias for g$lshzxe, so that the "AKE" string means all the events.
    555. #
    556. #  The "notify-keyspace-events" takes as argument a string that is composed
    557. #  by zero or multiple characters. The empty string means that notifications
    558. #  are disabled at all.
    559. #
    560. #  Example: to enable list and generic events, from the point of view of the
    561. #           event name, use:
    562. #
    563. #  notify-keyspace-events Elg
    564. #
    565. #  Example 2: to get the stream of the expired keys subscribing to channel
    566. #             name __keyevent@0__:expired use:
    567. #
    568. #  notify-keyspace-events Ex
    569. #
    570. #  By default all notifications are disabled because most users don't need
    571. #  this feature and the feature has some overhead. Note that if you don't
    572. #  specify at least one of K or E, no events will be delivered.
    573. notify-keyspace-events ""
    574. ############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
    575. # Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
    576. # small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
    577. # threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
    578. hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
    579. hash-max-ziplist-value 64
    580. # Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
    581. # to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
    582. # you are under the following limits:
    583. list-max-ziplist-entries 512
    584. list-max-ziplist-value 64
    585. # Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
    586. # of just strings that happens to be integers in radix 10 in the range
    587. # of 64 bit signed integers.
    588. # The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
    589. # set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
    590. set-max-intset-entries 512
    591. # Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
    592. # order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
    593. # elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
    594. zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
    595. zset-max-ziplist-value 64
    596. # HyperLogLog sparse representation bytes limit. The limit includes the
    597. # 16 bytes header. When an HyperLogLog using the sparse representation crosses
    598. # this limit, it is converted into the dense representation.
    599. #
    600. # A value greater than 16000 is totally useless, since at that point the
    601. # dense representation is more memory efficient.
    602. #
    603. # The suggested value is ~ 3000 in order to have the benefits of
    604. # the space efficient encoding without slowing down too much PFADD,
    605. # which is O(N) with the sparse encoding. The value can be raised to
    606. # ~ 10000 when CPU is not a concern, but space is, and the data set is
    607. # composed of many HyperLogLogs with cardinality in the 0 - 15000 range.
    608. hll-sparse-max-bytes 3000
    609. # Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
    610. # order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
    611. # keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
    612. # performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into a hash table
    613. # that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
    614. # server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
    615. # by the hash table.
    616. #
    617. # The default is to use this millisecond 10 times every second in order to
    618. # active rehashing the main dictionaries, freeing memory when possible.
    619. #
    620. # If unsure:
    621. # use "activerehashing no" if you have hard latency requirements and it is
    622. # not a good thing in your environment that Redis can reply form time to time
    623. # to queries with 2 milliseconds delay.
    624. #
    625. # use "activerehashing yes" if you don't have such hard requirements but
    626. # want to free memory asap when possible.
    627. activerehashing yes
    628. # The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
    629. # that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
    630. # common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
    631. # publisher can produce them).
    632. #
    633. # The limit can be set differently for the three different classes of clients:
    634. #
    635. # normal -> normal clients including MONITOR clients
    636. # slave  -> slave clients
    637. # pubsub -> clients subscribed to at least one pubsub channel or pattern
    638. #
    639. # The syntax of every client-output-buffer-limit directive is the following:
    640. #
    641. # client-output-buffer-limit <class> <hard limit> <soft limit> <soft seconds>
    642. #
    643. # A client is immediately disconnected once the hard limit is reached, or if
    644. # the soft limit is reached and remains reached for the specified number of
    645. # seconds (continuously).
    646. # So for instance if the hard limit is 32 megabytes and the soft limit is
    647. # 16 megabytes / 10 seconds, the client will get disconnected immediately
    648. # if the size of the output buffers reach 32 megabytes, but will also get
    649. # disconnected if the client reaches 16 megabytes and continuously overcomes
    650. # the limit for 10 seconds.
    651. #
    652. # By default normal clients are not limited because they don't receive data
    653. # without asking (in a push way), but just after a request, so only
    654. # asynchronous clients may create a scenario where data is requested faster
    655. # than it can read.
    656. #
    657. # Instead there is a default limit for pubsub and slave clients, since
    658. # subscribers and slaves receive data in a push fashion.
    659. #
    660. # Both the hard or the soft limit can be disabled by setting them to zero.
    661. client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
    662. client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
    663. client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
    664. # Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
    665. # closing connections of clients in timeout, purging expired keys that are
    666. # never requested, and so forth.
    667. #
    668. # Not all tasks are performed with the same frequency, but Redis checks for
    669. # tasks to perform accordingly to the specified "hz" value.
    670. #
    671. # By default "hz" is set to 10. Raising the value will use more CPU when
    672. # Redis is idle, but at the same time will make Redis more responsive when
    673. # there are many keys expiring at the same time, and timeouts may be
    674. # handled with more precision.
    675. #
    676. # The range is between 1 and 500, however a value over 100 is usually not
    677. # a good idea. Most users should use the default of 10 and raise this up to
    678. # 100 only in environments where very low latency is required.
    679. hz 10
    680. # When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
    681. # the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
    682. # in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
    683. # big latency spikes.
    684. aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes
    Display All


    Wie hast du den Redis-Server installiert, welches Betriebssystem nutzt du?
  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    dobi wrote:


    hi, lies dir mal diesen Thread durch, vielleicht kommst du weiter?
    http://rpi-controlcenter.de/showthread.php?tid=523


    Hi,
    das wird der gleiche Fehler sein, ist mir gestern bei der Intallation auf einem Slave auch passiert.

    ändere mal den Dateinamen für die Redis config in der install.php (Zeile 539) von

    ....'./rwf/db.config'....

    in

    ....'./rwf/db.config.json'....

    PS: Es hilft unheimlich, wenn du beim nächsten mal die Fehlermeldung bzw. deine Eingabe und die darauf folgende Ausgabe des Terminals hier mit angibst.
    PPS: dürfte ein Käfer sein, oder @Agent47

    grüße

    The post was edited 1 time, last by xerox ().

  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    Okay das hat schonmal geklappt. Jetzt bekomme ich aber eine Fehlerseite wenn ich den Webserver öffne:

    System Error

    Die App ist nicht bekannt
    Klasse: Exception
    File: global.php
    Line: 53
    Code: 1010
    Stack:

    #0 /var/www/shc/index.php @ Line: 17
    require_once()
    #1 {main}
  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    Jetzt bin ich solangsam überfragt. Muss ich mich wohl mal mit beschäftigen danke schonmal.

    Laut Terminal hat alles geklappt aber anscheind ja nicht. Der Fehler kommt wenn ich auf die Seite vom Contolcenter gehen will.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by marco88 ().

  • RE: Kleines Problem während Installation

    marco88 wrote:


    Okay das hat schonmal geklappt. Jetzt bekomme ich aber eine Fehlerseite wenn ich den Webserver öffne:

    System Error

    Die App ist nicht bekannt
    Klasse: Exception
    File: global.php
    Line: 53
    Code: 1010
    Stack:

    #0 /var/www/shc/index.php @ Line: 17
       require_once()
    #1 {main}


    Bedeutet das nicht einfach ein falscher aufruf der Webseite wie z.B so http://x.x.x.x/shc/